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MAKING WORK FATIGUE LOSE ITS GRIP OVER YOU

Even when we are sure to get enough sleep at night, eat nutritiously, and practice self-care, feelings of stress can creep in.

Though tiredness on its own is usually resolved after a night or two of quality and undisturbed rest, the relationship between chronic lack of sleep and work fatigue is hard to ignore. Addressing the effects of work fatigue should touch on every area of our life, not just our desk jobs.

When we feel overwhelmed with stress, facing our own work fatigue proactively can seem daunting. It is quite healthy and wise to take necessary breaks.

Typically, this amounts to a 30-minute break for every 4 to 8 hours worked. Getting up and around, especially in desk jobs, is essential to keep our circulation healthy and mind clear.

Resist the impulse to skip lunch. When those hunger signals strike, fuel your body with healthy options like fruits, veggies, and whole grains. This level of self-care will not only help you focus and do your job better, but your body and mind will thank you for it as well.

At-home changes can also improve our time spent at work. Though work fatigue may incite us to immediately slip into bed for a post-work nap, this influence only reinforces poor coping mechanisms and disordered sleeping habits.

Adults need an average of 8 hours of sleep every night, and even just a few nights in a row of disturbed rest can leave us irritable and distracted during the day. Unfortunately, 46% of people say they are unable to calm their minds enough to fall asleep and stay asleep when dealing with stress.

At-home changes can also improve our time spent at work. Though work fatigue may incite us to immediately slip into bed for a post-work nap, this influence only reinforces poor coping mechanisms and disordered sleeping habits.

Adults need an average of 8 hours of sleep every night, and even just a few nights in a row of disturbed rest can leave us irritable and distracted during the day. Unfortunately, 46% of people say they are unable to calm their minds enough to fall asleep and stay asleep when dealing with stress.




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