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HERE’S HOW I’M LEARNING TO GET OFF THE ‘PETTY’ BUS

As much as I adore watching inspirational videos and reading intellectual books for my growth and continuous restoration; I am an occasional fan of ratchet reality shows such as, you guessed it, ‘Reality Housewives of Atlanta’. I know, I know but I’m working with Jesus to fix me all the way up.

One key constant in these reality shows is how petty the characters all seem to appear. For the non-internet savvy, I’ll define what I mean by ‘petty’.

Petty is the act of making things, events, or actions normal people dismiss as trivial or insignificant into excuses to be upset, uncooperative, childish, or stubborn

Trust the Urban Dictionary to have the most apt definitions.

While catching up to date with all that I had missed over the holidays, I realised how I embodied some of the things I was critical about with these characters such as: being judgemental, a lack of empathy and deciding to drag out an issue that could have been dealt with as maturely as possible. I made a mental note to make a change and already today, I have been tested but I got off the petty bus real quick, people. Inserts Halleluyah.

As a struggling ‘pettyholic’… I decided to draw out some of the steps that are aiding my recovery.

 

  1. EAT

You heard correctly. I realised that I was so quick to act because I was on this diet which meant that I was always hungry. You know what they say about the hungry man.

A hungry man is an angry man

Everyone is happier with a full stomach.

 

2. BREATHE

Anger is such an impulsive emotion. You don’t get to think or breathe, you simply react in the moment. Focusing on your breathing and taking a step back to think about the situation holistically would make all the difference.

Matthew 5:39

But I tell you, do not resist an evil person. If anyone slaps you on the right cheek, turn to them the other cheek also.

3. CULTIVATE COMPASSION

Sometimes, we’re so focused on our own pain that we never stop to take into account the other person’s reasons for erring us the way they did and gauging whether or not it was even intentional to begin with. Sometimes, all it will take is having an honest conversation with your ‘offender’ where the aim is not to protect your pride but to gain a mutual understanding of where both parties are coming from.

 

These steps seem easy enough but it all begins with a consciousness of who you are which you can only grasp after some much-needed soul searching.




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